Friday, May 1, 2009

Georgia's 7 Natural Wonders

You’ve probably heard plenty about the 7 natural wonders of the world, but my home state of Georgia has its own 7 natural wonders.  I was born and raised in the state of Georgia.  I raised my children in the state of Georgia and I look forward to watching my future grandchildren grow up in the state of Georgia.  I have loved living here.  It truly is a beautiful state and a great place to raise a family.  Georgia is filled with places to go, things to do, and beautiful things to see.  Here are Georgia's 7 natural wonders.

Georgia's 7 Natural Wonders


Georgia's 7 Natural Wonders


Stone Mountain Stone Mountain is probably the most popular of Georgia’s 7 natural wonders.  Stone Mountain is the largest most exposed mass of granite in the world.  About 4 million people visit the mountain every year.  Visitors to Stone Mountain park enjoy a variety of attractions including the confederate memorial carving, a summit skyride, a nightly laser show, campgrounds, golf, and so much more.  For a complete guide to Stone Mountain and to plan your trip, visit the Stone Mountain Park website here.

Warm Springs:  The town of Warm Springs, Georgia is home to Georgia’s natural warm springs.  The water flows down Pine Mountain from nearly 90 degree springs. President Franklin D. Roosevelt visited the springs to treat his paralysis due to Polio.  In fact, he had a home in Warm Springs called The Little White House.  For more information about Georgia’s Warm Springs, visit the Warm Springs website here.

Amicalola Falls:  Amicalola Falls is absolutely beautiful.  Visitors  enjoy a mountain top lodge, hiking trails including part of the Appalachian Trail, and they will visit the tallest cascading water fall in the southeast.  To learn more about Amicalola Falls, visit the Georgia State Parks website here.

Tallulah Gorge:  I recently hiked Tallulah Gorge.  It wasn’t easy but it was worth it.  The Tallulah Gorge canyon is 2 miles long and 1000 feet deep.  Visitors can hike trails, view overlooks, and more.  Visit the Georgia State Parks website here to learn more about Tallulah Gorge.

Radium Springs:  Radium Springs is Georgia’s largest natural spring located on the east side of the Flint River in Albany.  The spring pours out 70,000 gallons of fresh water per minute.  The spot was best known for swimming and fishing until the 20th century discovery that the springs contained traces of radium.  In addition to the springs glowing blue color, visitors also enjoy cottages, riding and walking trails, and golf courses.  To learn more about Radium Springs, visit the Radium Springs Gardens site here.

The Okefenokee Swamp:  The Okefenokee Swamp is one of the “largest natural, unspoiled freshwater and black water wilderness swamps in North America.” (Okefenokee.com)  It covers about 7oo square miles.  The word “Okefenokee” means “land of trembling Earth” in the Creek Indian language.  The swamp offers paddle and motor boat trails, cabins, camping, and guided tours.  To learn more about The Okefenokee Swamp, visit the Okefenokee Swamp website here.

Providence Canyon:  Providence Canyon is also known as Georgia’s “Little Grand Canyon.”  Poor farming practices in the 1800s resulted in massive gullies as deep as 150 feet.  Visitors enjoy beautiful views in unique natural colors, hiking trails, and cottages.  For more information about Providence Canyon, visit the Georgia State Parks website here.
Read about more great places to visit in the state of Georgia here.


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